Sobre este curso

Oxford University
  • Data de início

    2020 - 2021
  • Fees

    £0
  • Study mode

    Full-Time
  • Ucas Code

  • Campus

    Oxford University
  • Qualification

    Master of Philosophy
Sumário

O melhor curso na melhor universidade para você

The information provided on this page was correct at the time of publication (November 2019). For complete and up-to-date information about this course, please visit the relevant University of Oxford course page via www.graduate.ox.ac.uk/ucas The two-year MPhil course offers coordinated training in both social and biological anthropological approaches to health and illness, with special emphasis on methods. It provides the necessary basis for future anthropological research and an excellent cross-cultural grounding for those aiming to pursue a career in anthropology, global health or other health-related fields. The MPhil is similar in topical scope and breadth to the MSc, but it allows for a deeper engagement with the theory and practice of anthropological research. It is intended both as a standalone degree and as a broader and deeper preparation for doctoral research than is possible with the MSc. During the first year of the MPhil you would follow the same course of instruction as MSc students through to the June examinations, which serve as qualifying (rather than final) exams for MPhil students to progress to the second year. In the first year there is one option paper and three core papers, as follows: Paper 1: Critical Medical Anthropology Paper 2: Biocultural Approaches to Medicine Paper 3: Anthropologies of the Body At the end of the first year, you then use the summer vacation to acquire a firm grounding in medical anthropological literature and develop your dissertation outline based on this background reading. Fieldwork is not a necessary component of the MPhil degree, although you can undertake it over the vacation. Study towards the MPhil degree in the second year consists of class-based course work, participation in seminars and individual research, written up in a dissertation. Coursework in the second year has three components: critical reading classes in Michaelmas Term (assessed by the writing of a research proposal) and participation in two different methods classes in Michaelmas term and/or Hilary term (assessed by submitted coursework). The range of methods classes varies yearly and includes (but is not limited to): Ethnographic Fieldwork Methods Ethnographic Portraiture Statistical Fieldwork Methods for the Analysis of Quantitative Social Science Data Critical Methods of Numerical Analysis Language-Focused Methods Ethnobiology Fieldwork Methods Together, these three components comprise one examined paper, Methods of Fieldwork and Social Research, which is assessed by a dossier of written work completed over the course of the year rather than by a final written examination. There is one core seminar series in medical anthropology, the Medical Anthropology Research Seminars in Michaelmas term. In addition to those, there is a rich seminar culture of the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) and the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography (SAME), and students are expected to actively participate in those. MSc The MSc consists of four papers on which you will be examined in June, and a 10,000-word dissertation which you will submit in late August. The three core papers, taught across Michaelmas and Hilary Terms, each comprise 16 lectures, three tutorials and one debate. You will also select an option paper, which may have a topical or regional focus, based on your own interests. The core papers are as follows: Paper 1: Critical Medical Anthropology Paper 2: Biocultural Approaches to Medicine Paper 3: Anthropologies of the Body There is one core seminar series in medical anthropology, the Medical Anthropology Research Seminars in Michaelmas term.

Quer saber se pode entrar nesta Universidade?

ENTRE EM CONTATO